A video montage featuring a parade of various military aircraft, accompanied by a live reading of Work for Peace, by the late, great, poet-bluesologist  Gil Scott-Heron.

Gilbert “Gil” Scott-Heron (April 1, 1949 – May 27, 2011) was an American soul and jazz poet, musician, and author known primarily for his work as a spoken word performer in the 1970s and ’80s. His collaborative efforts with musician Brian Jackson featured a musical fusion of jazz, blues, and soul, as well as lyrical content concerning the social and political issues of the time.  His own term for himself was “bluesologist”, which he defined as “a scientist who is concerned with the origin of the blues.”

An excerpt from the article “An Evening with Gil Scott-Heron: There is Joy

in the Struggle” by Kevin Gosztola
http://www.opednews.com/articles/1/An-Evening-with-Gil-Scott-by-Kevin-Gosztola-100221-171.html

“You can’t teach the value of creative expression in school. You can’t tell someone they have to use their art or media for the greater good. But, you can envelope someone in events with people like Gil Scott-Heron who believe in what they do and show them an alternative to the art and media we consume on a regular basis that seems to be far removed from the
issues we experience and the lives we live every single day.

What Gil Scott-Heron shows is that people can find a voice in art (especially music). Movements need people like Gil Scott-Heron to open people’s minds so that people who are not creative, not humorous, or not artistic can then present people with some truths that might compel them to act.

Yes, we’ve got to work for peace. There ain’t gonna be no peace unless we go to work. But, peace isn’t just taking down the military or breaking up the monetary and the military. It isn’t just finding confidence in fighting for what some deem a lost cause, something unrealistic.

Peace is having soul. Peace is unleashing that soul in the company of others. And, peace is having the fortitude to push on and do what you believe needs to be done so that the next day you can have high spirits and maintain high hopes for a brighter day.”

Work for Peace!

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